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03.20.2020 / Safety « Back to all articles

What to Do Now if You’ve Given Out Important Personal Information
Hackers steal personal information like passwords

Scams and Schemes 

This is the Information Age.  Facts, data and knowledge are the currencies of the day, our most valuable commodities.  Through the Internet especially, personal information is swapped and sent, from government ID numbers to bank information and credit cards.  This is all meant to be convenient, but also to be secure, so that no one can use personal information to rack up bills or otherwise steal from an unsuspecting victim.   

But schemers are crafty, and identity theft happens all the time, despite best efforts.  Whether it is through a phishing attempt (an email or text message with a link that takes information), hacking, or more surreptitious methods, criminals have many ways to get of sensitive information.   

If personal information has been unintentionally given to someone who intends to use it for nefarious purposes, be prepared to react.  People suffer from identity theft every day.  It need not be a scam phone call; it could be a website that had a breach in security or an unscrupulous waitress writing down credit card numbers.  But if the bank statement starts showing shifty charges or your credit report has accounts that were definitely not opened by you, it’s time to take action. 

 

Report the Schemer 

There is little a person can do after the breach has happened in order to reverse the damage done.  Because the perpetrators are anonymous and online, this has to be handled by professionals.  It is imperative that the moment anyone recognizes that a theft has occurred, report the theft to the police or governmental agency specifically tasked to handle identity theft and cybercrime.   

At that point it is also key to alert all financial institutions in order to shut down the active accounts and start making changes like opening new accounts or issuing new cards.  Call the credit agencies and file a fraud report so that credit can be repaired if necessary.  Any other institution or business involved needs to be notified immediately, too.  The goal is to lock down the use of all personal information and raise the alert so that the thief can be caught the next time they act with any of the victim’s information. 

 

Secure All Information 

This can be a long and frustrating process, but once the fraud has been cleared up it is imperative to make sure all personal information is secure.  Do not respond to emails or phone calls that are not from a verified source and never send sensitive information through email or any other insecure channel.  Even in the physical world, shred important documents before throwing them away, guard all PINs and passcodes carefully, and do not give out any information unless it can be verified who is receiving the information and who is going to use it. 

07.02.2020 / Borrowing

5 Good Signs You Can Afford More House
Moving on Up  Buying your first house is a huge milestone, but it’s often not the “forever home”.  Most people move…

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03.20.2020 / Safety « Back to all articles

What to Do Now if You’ve Given Out Important Personal Information
Hackers steal personal information like passwords

Scams and Schemes 

This is the Information Age.  Facts, data and knowledge are the currencies of the day, our most valuable commodities.  Through the Internet especially, personal information is swapped and sent, from government ID numbers to bank information and credit cards.  This is all meant to be convenient, but also to be secure, so that no one can use personal information to rack up bills or otherwise steal from an unsuspecting victim.   

But schemers are crafty, and identity theft happens all the time, despite best efforts.  Whether it is through a phishing attempt (an email or text message with a link that takes information), hacking, or more surreptitious methods, criminals have many ways to get of sensitive information.   

If personal information has been unintentionally given to someone who intends to use it for nefarious purposes, be prepared to react.  People suffer from identity theft every day.  It need not be a scam phone call; it could be a website that had a breach in security or an unscrupulous waitress writing down credit card numbers.  But if the bank statement starts showing shifty charges or your credit report has accounts that were definitely not opened by you, it’s time to take action. 

 

Report the Schemer 

There is little a person can do after the breach has happened in order to reverse the damage done.  Because the perpetrators are anonymous and online, this has to be handled by professionals.  It is imperative that the moment anyone recognizes that a theft has occurred, report the theft to the police or governmental agency specifically tasked to handle identity theft and cybercrime.   

At that point it is also key to alert all financial institutions in order to shut down the active accounts and start making changes like opening new accounts or issuing new cards.  Call the credit agencies and file a fraud report so that credit can be repaired if necessary.  Any other institution or business involved needs to be notified immediately, too.  The goal is to lock down the use of all personal information and raise the alert so that the thief can be caught the next time they act with any of the victim’s information. 

 

Secure All Information 

This can be a long and frustrating process, but once the fraud has been cleared up it is imperative to make sure all personal information is secure.  Do not respond to emails or phone calls that are not from a verified source and never send sensitive information through email or any other insecure channel.  Even in the physical world, shred important documents before throwing them away, guard all PINs and passcodes carefully, and do not give out any information unless it can be verified who is receiving the information and who is going to use it. 

Need a
Loan?

Loans from $120 to $15,000. Get funded as soon as today!

07.02.2020 / Borrowing

5 Good Signs You Can Afford More House
Moving on Up  Buying your first house is a huge milestone, but it’s often not the “forever home”.  Most people move…